Tuesday, August 10, 2010

Essaay: "Notes of a Native Son." James Baldwin.

Review: One of the essential ideas in this essay occurs in the last paragraph. “It began to seem that one would have to hold in the mind forever two ideas which seemed to be in opposition. The first idea was acceptance, the acceptance, totally, without rancor, of life as it is, and men as they are: in light of this idea, it goes without saying that injustice is a commonplace. But this did not mean that one could be complacent, for the second idea was of equal power: that one must never, in one’s own life, accept these injustices as commonplace but must fight them with all one’s strength. This fight begins, however, in the heart and it now had been laid to my charge to keep my own heart free of hatred and despair. This information made my heart heavy and, now that my father was irrecoverable, I wished that he had been beside me so that I could have searched his face for the answers which only the future could give me now.”

Editor’s Note: “in Baldwin’s hands…the essay lost its stigma of benign, belletristic coziness and became a matter of life and death.” Phillip Lopate.

The Art of the Personal Essay: An Anthology from the Classical Era to the Present. Ed. Phillip Lopate. New York: Anchor Books, 1995.

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